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Dubliners
Cover of Dubliners
Dubliners
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Introduction by John Banville

James Joyce was the singular figure of modernism, and to this day his grand vision looms large over contemporary literature and the entire Western canon. His stylistic innovations were revolutionary, yet nowhere is Joyce more accessible than in this volume of short stories, a brilliant collection that celebrates, critiques, and immortalizes the place that Joyce knew better than anyone else: Dublin. From the young boy encountering death in the opening story, "The Sisters," to the middle-aged protagonist of its haunting finale, "The Dead," considered one of the greatest short stories of all time, Dubliners is a vivid portrait of the city in all its glory and hardship, and a seminal work that redefined the short form. Featuring a new Introduction by acclaimed novelist John Banville, this edition is not only a breathless portal into Joyce's "dear dirty Dublin" but a vital literary treasure from one of the great masters of all time.

Introduction by John Banville

James Joyce was the singular figure of modernism, and to this day his grand vision looms large over contemporary literature and the entire Western canon. His stylistic innovations were revolutionary, yet nowhere is Joyce more accessible than in this volume of short stories, a brilliant collection that celebrates, critiques, and immortalizes the place that Joyce knew better than anyone else: Dublin. From the young boy encountering death in the opening story, "The Sisters," to the middle-aged protagonist of its haunting finale, "The Dead," considered one of the greatest short stories of all time, Dubliners is a vivid portrait of the city in all its glory and hardship, and a seminal work that redefined the short form. Featuring a new Introduction by acclaimed novelist John Banville, this edition is not only a breathless portal into Joyce's "dear dirty Dublin" but a vital literary treasure from one of the great masters of all time.

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  • Kindle Book
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Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
    8.2
  • Lexile:
    910
  • Interest Level:
    UG
  • Text Difficulty:
    4 - 7

Recommended for you

Excerpts-
  • Chapter Two THERE was no hope for him this time: it was the third stroke. Night after night I had passed the house (it was vacation time) and studied the lighted square of window: and night after night I had found it lighted in the same way, faintly and evenly. If he was dead, I thought, I would see the reflection of candles on the darkened blind for I knew that two candles must be set at the head of a corpse. He had often said to me: I am not long for this world, and I had thought his words idle. Now I knew they were true. Every night as I gazed up at the window I said softly to myself the word paralysis. It had always sounded strangely in my ears, like the word gnomon in the Euclid and the word simony in the Catechism. But now it sounded to me like the name of some maleficent and sinful being. It filled me with fear, and yet I longed to be nearer to it and to look upon its deadly work.

    Old Cotter was sitting at the fire, smoking, when I came downstairs to supper. While my aunt was ladling out my stirabout he said, as if returning to some former remark of his:

    —No, I wouldn't say he was exactly . . . but there was something queer . . . there was something uncanny about him. I'll tell you my opinion. . . .

    He began to puff at his pipe, no doubt arranging his opinion in his mind. Tiresome old fool! When we knew him first he used to be rather interesting, talking of faints and worms; but I soon grew tired of him and his endless stories about the distillery.

    —I have my own theory about it, he said. I think it was one of those . . . peculiar cases. . . . But it's hard to say. . . .

    He began to puff again at his pipe without giving us his theory. My uncle saw me staring and said to me:

    —Well, so your old friend is gone, you'll be sorry to hear.

    —Who? said I.

    —Father Flynn.

    —Is he dead?

    —Mr Cotter here has just told us. He was passing by the house.

    I knew that I was under observation so I continued eating as if the news had not interested me. My uncle explained to old Cotter.

    —The youngster and he were great friends. The old chap taught him a great deal, mind you; and they say he had a great wish for him.

    —God have mercy on his soul, said my aunt piously.

    Old Cotter looked at me for a while. I felt that his little beady black eyes were examining me but I would not satisfy him by looking up from my plate. He returned to his pipe and finally spat rudely into the grate.

    —I wouldn't like children of mine, he said, to have too much to say to a man like that.

    —How do you mean, Mr Cotter? asked my aunt.

    —What I mean is, said old Cotter, it's bad for children. My idea is: let a young lad run about and play with young lads of his own age and not be . . . Am I right, Jack?

    —That's my principle, too, said my uncle. Let him learn to box his corner. That's what I'm always saying to that Rosicrucian there: take exercise. Why, when I was a nipper every morning of my life I had a cold bath, winter and summer. And that's what stands to me now. Education is all very fine and large. . . . Mr Cotter might take a pick of that leg of mutton, he added to my aunt.

    —No, no, not for me, said old Cotter.

    —My aunt brought the dish from the safe and laid it on the table.

    —But why do you think it's not good for children, Mr Cotter? she asked.

    —It's bad for children, said old Cotter, because their minds are so impressionable. When children see things like that, you know, it has an effect. . . .

    I crammed my mouth with stirabout for fear I...
About the Author-
  • The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern Library has been a staple of the American book trade, providing readers with affordable hardbound editions of important works of literature and thought. For the Modern Library's seventy-fifth anniversary, Random House redesigned the series, restoring as its emblem the running torch-bearer created by Lucian Bernhard in 1925 and refurbishing jackets, bindings, and type, as well as inaugurating a new program of selecting titles. The Modern Library continues to provide the world's best books, at the best prices.
Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    Starred review from July 11, 2005
    Frank and Malachy McCourt and 13 Irish actors bring Joyce's short stories to life in this well-produced audiobook. None of the readers employ a thick accent in the narrative portions, but for dialogue they let their imitative talents shine and their Irish lilts bloom. Brendan Coyle and Charles Keating, reading "A Little Cloud" and "Grace" respectively, give such wonderful expression to the idiosyncrasies of every individual voice that the listener is never confused even when numerous men are talking. Joyce wrote only sparingly in actual dialect, but most of the readers interpret his intentions freely and successfully. Fionnula Flanagan is perfect reading "A Mother," her voice shifting easily between prim and proper tones and fiery indignation punctuated with little sighs. It helps that Joyce's writing is so masterful that when Flanagan and the two other actresses read the three stories that revolve around women, their words sound utterly natural. Not all the performances are on the same level—Stephen Rea's cold, somber voice is apt for the meditative beginning and ending sections of the collection's most famous story, "The Dead," but too flat for the central description of a lively party. This audiobook creates the atmosphere of a fireside storytelling session that will hold any listener in rapt attention.

  • Publisher's Weekly

    June 26, 2017
    Actor Sheridan proves an excellent choice to interpret Joyce’s classic story collection, first published in 1914. He brings an authentic Irish accent and an air of gravitas to the 15 tightly observed scen­­es of ordinary people around Dublin. He infuses life into Joyce’s numerous and wide-ranging characters, from an adolescent boy’s stifling infatuation with the girl who lives across the street (“Araby”) to the husband and wife whose marriage is haunted by the death of the wife’s former lover (“The Dead”), easily handling the shifting points of view from story to story. Each character is given a distinct personality and individual voice. But it is with Joyce’s rich descriptive prose that Sheridan’s skills shine brightest. His thoughtful and heartfelt delivery captures the full emotional weight of the stories, and by the end the listener has been transported to Joyce’s Dublin.

  • from the Introduction

    "In Dubliners, Joyce's first attempt to register in language and fictive form the protean complexities of the 'reality of experience,' he learns the paradoxical lesson that only through the most rigorous economy, only by concentrating on the minutest of particulars, can he have any hope of engaging with the immensity of the world."

  • Atlantic Monthly "Joyce renews our apprehension of reality, strengthens our sympathy with our fellow creatures, and leaves us in awe before the mystery of created things."
  • Robert Scholes and A. Walton Litz, authors of Dubliners: Text and Criticism "It is in the prose of Dubliners that we first hear the authentic rhythms of Joyce the poet...Dubliners is, in a very real sense, the foundation of Joyce's art. In shaping its stories, he developed that mastery of naturalistic detail and symbolic design which is the hallmark of his mature fiction."
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